Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Darwinopterus by NTamura Darwinopterus by NTamura
Darwinopterus modularis, the newly discovered "missing link" between the rhamphorhynchoids and the pterodactyloids....
proportions based on skeletal by :iconarchosaurian:

More about it:

[link]
Add a Comment:
 
:iconjdailey1991:
Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
I see nothing but rhamphorhynchoid.  Where's the pterodactyl in this missing link?
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner May 8, 2015
It has long neck vertebrae like the pterodactyloids and some structure of the skull are more advanced than rhamphorhynchoids
Reply
:icontffan234:
TFfan234 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2011
Very Nice, I was just checking out ScienceDaily which features new news in all fields and just recently scientists found the fossil of a Darwinopterus with an egg but it lacked a crest so apparently only the males have the crests.
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2011
Yes, very interesting article...
Reply
:iconcedric116-b45:
Cedric116-B45 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I love dinosaurs. This is awesome!!!:love:
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2010
Thanks! :)
Reply
:iconcedric116-b45:
Cedric116-B45 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:icongrin--plz::iconyouarewelcomeplz:
Reply
:iconjason244555:
Jason244555 Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2010
How about that! When did it live? Early Jurassic?
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2010
Middle Jurassic of China. Thanks for the :+fav:!
Reply
:iconjason244555:
Jason244555 Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2010
Wow, Middle Jurassic huh? One more question (I promise) do you know what stage age? It may have been flying over Shunosaurus and the last of the Barapasaurus, what that landscape must have looked like, once again wow!
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2010
It's Callovian so a bit too late to have seen Shuno in life (Bajocian)...
Reply
:iconsethness:
sethness Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2010
I'm a big fan of your photoreal archaeological work.

What software do you use, to create images like this?
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2010
I use a combination of 3ds max, zbrush and photoshop
Reply
:iconsethness:
sethness Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2010
Are you self-taught?

I've heard so much about zbrush from the 3D nature artists I respect at dA. Is it difficult to learn?
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2010
Yes, I am. Zbrush is actually very easy to learn... kind of very intuitive
Reply
:iconsinande:
Sinande Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2010
Let me join the admirers of the motion blur. Also, commenters, thanks for the discussion of patagia. It was an interesting read. :thumbsup:
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2010
Thanks! :)
Reply
:iconkoolasuchus:
Koolasuchus Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
This thing does fly fast... xD
Reply
:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Looks great! Really resembles Pterorhynchus. I like that, given the angle, it's hard to tell whether it's meant to have a Pterorchynchus-like vertical tail frond or not. Ambiguity = accuracy :)
Reply
:iconpanthera11:
Panthera11 Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
Great work mate!
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2009
Thanks mate! :)
Reply
:iconsphenacodon:
Sphenacodon Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
The angle and action in the shot is pretty awesome.
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
:D
Reply
:iconmalevouvenator:
malevouvenator Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
Which program you use to made 3d models?
It fantastic.
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
3DSmax, Zbrush and photoshop...
Reply
:icondgylia:
Dgylia Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I like what you have shown action :D It seems what the darwinopterus is really flying :D
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
Thanks! :)
Reply
:icondgylia:
Dgylia Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Welcome ~~~
Reply
:iconryivhnn:
Ryivhnn Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009   Digital Artist
Looks like one of my early Flyer models ;) Love the motion blur.
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
:D
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2009  Student Writer
I think that everyone now agrees that the uropatagium was actually a cruropatagium (aka it did not involve the tail), but its still wonderfull
Reply
:iconarchosaurian:
Archosaurian Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2009
No, I think Unwin is the only one who promotes the 'cruropatagium' concept, but it doesn't really work out given the anatomy of later pterosaurs, the positioning of the legs with relation to the tail, aerodynamically, or even in light of the Sordes specimen that Unwin cites as evidence. If you look at it, there is an obvious crease between the left and right halves and it is more likely that the uropatagium simply became detached from the tail during decomposition.
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2009  Student Writer
Mark Witton also seems to promote the concept, as his pictures of anurognathids show the best. Other "rhamphorhynchoid" pics show it in a more subtle way; his now famous Darwinopterus pic has the tail seperated from the uropatagium/cruropatagium, as the shading demonstrates.

I think John Conway did considered the concept of a cruropatagium because the tail structure of pterodactyloids was too delicate to support the membrane and the pressures associated with such. I have no idea for non-pterodactyloids though
Reply
:iconarchosaurian:
Archosaurian Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2009
Pteranodon has an interesting tail structure in which the final caudal vertebra is extended into two long narrow supportive rods that probably had the same supportive function for a patagium that the pteroid or the 'rhamphorhynchoid' fifth digit has. I think it is the most compelling and most ignored piece of evidence against a cruropatagium. I also don't think the tail structure of pterodactyloids was so delicate that it couldn't withstand forces on the membrane. I don't think Conway ever supported the idea of a leg-to-leg membrane, though he does restore an ankle-to-upper-thigh membrane in various pterosaurs.
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2009  Student Writer
He is sort of neutral in the subject, because his pterosaurs really only have two membranes running along the legs, which are suppoerted by either the uropatagium or cruropatagium models, since we all agree pterodactyloids reduced their patagia strongly anyway.

Given my status in the debate, I really don't know what so say of all of this. For one side, pterodactyloids sure did conserved their tails for a long time, but only Pteranodon truly has any evidence of having had a proper uropatagium. Perhaps Pteranodon developed it as a requirement for a mostly aerial lfestyle, and whereas a cruropatagium or an uropatagium was the original model Pterpdactyloids in general only had membranes running along the legs
Reply
:iconntamura:
NTamura Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
Yes, I think I read this somewhere. This could be easily be fixed with Photoshop. Thanks.
Reply
:iconkangaskid:
KangasKid Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2009
Nice one, gotta love Darwinopterus! Was the tail vane intentionally left off as an artistic choice, or is there some line of evidence here that I'm not aware of? Just curious because I know it's a point of contention in this reptile.
Reply
:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2009  Student Writer
I think he based the picture on this:

[link]

As you can see the author also left the tail vane out. I suppose this is a way of showing that this pterosaur was becoming more pterodactyloid, loosing the tail vanes as its tail was becoming for useless
Reply
:iconarchosaurian:
Archosaurian Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2009
I left out the tail vane mainly because we don't know what it looked like and given the variety among known tail vanes in non-pterodactyloids, there would just be too much speculation involved.
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo




Details

Submitted on
November 3, 2009
Image Size
2.9 MB
Resolution
3840×2880
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
4,025 (2 today)
Favourites
69 (who?)
Comments
40

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
×